EuroCG 2013 part 2

The EuroCG just finished today. I already posted about day 1, so here is the second part. Don't forget that all abstracts are available for download.

Day 2

The second day also had some very nice talks. Probably the talk I was looking most forward to was the talk of Stefan Felsner about "Exploiting Air Pressure to Map Floorplans on Point Sets". A floorplan is a dissection of a rectangle into smaller rectangles. All rectangles are axis aligned. The floorplan is realized on a point set, if every segment contains exactly one point of the point set. Stefan showed that for every floorplan, you can find a realization of an equivalent floorplan on every point set in general position. This is not only a nice result, Stefan used also some cool tools to prove it.

Another talk I liked was given by Nieke Aerts about "Straight Line Triangle Representation" (joint work with Stefan Felsner). Nieke talked about the following problem: Can I draw a planar graph, such that every face has the form of a triangle? To realize such drawings many vertices have to be adjacent to an angle of exactly 180°. The talk was about necessary and sufficient conditions that such drawings exist. There are still many open questions left. This problem seems related to the stretchability of combinatorial pseudo-triangulations, but the straight line triangle representations are more difficult to understand - at least for now.

The second invited talk was given by James McLurkin. James talked about geometric challenges in multi-robot systems and showed many nice videos.

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EuroCG 2013 part 1

This post is about  the European Workshop on Computational Geometry, number 29. This year's workshop takes place in Braunschweig Brunswick, Germany. In case you are interested, there is a  book of abstracts ready for download.

Day 1

The first day had already some very interesting talks. For those of you who don't know, the EuroCG has parallel tracks, so unfortunately, I missed some of the talks. Here is a small selection of talks I found especially interesting (form my very personal perspective):

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User study on curved drawings by TU/e group

I am a big fan of using circular arcs in drawings of plane graphs. Right now contradicting studies have been published whether circular-arc drawings or straight-line drawings are more appealing. (In my opinion it heavily depends on the quality of the circular-arc drawing.)

A group from the TU Eindhoven (Arthur van Goethem, Wouter Meulemans, Bettina Speckmann, Jo Wood) is currently conducting a new online user study. If you would like to participate visit this link. (It will take 10 minutes.)

I close this post with a circular-arc drawing I made for the graph of the dodecahedron which uses the minimum number of arcs.

dodecahedral-better